Interactive Text Ideas

Text is brilliant. You should always bet on text.

But interactivity is good too.

Here's a series of ideas I find interesting, many of which combine text and interactivity. Many of them are from demos that were never fully realised, confined to the marginalia of history. Some of them became very influential.

First the printing press and for this we go back to Johanes Gutenberg. The ability to move letters around, endlessly reconfiguring them, was a key to the rise of the Gutenberg galaxy.

Skip a few years, past the garden of forking paths and we find.

"A mesh of associative trails "

We're unstuck in time. It's 1945, both before and after Hiroshima, and Vanevar Bush publishes As we may think, outlining how collective memory will be available to all in a machine called the Memex.

They imagined people blazing and sharing "A mesh of associative trails" through the collective knowledge space. Imagine a guided tour bus. The tour guide gives information, takes you to the sites where you can hop off and have your own experience. The next bus arrives as soon as you want it. The tour guide knows all.

It's 1934. We're unstuck in time. (I've mentioned that 100 times already)

Paul Otlet publishes "Traité de documentation", proposing, among other innovations, annotated links between documents

from: HyperTextHistory, and see Boxes and Arrows

"Everything is Deeply Intertwingled"

everything_is_deeply_intertwingled_th.png

We're unstuck in time. It's 1967. It's 1960. Ted Nelson's Project Xanadu is the first hypertext project. The world wide web, that is inspired by it decades later, fails to live up to the goals of Project Xanadu.

It's 2018. Ted Nelson explains that we still don't have "visible connection" and "parallel documents" — see video, it's a gem:

StretchText is a hypertext feature that has not gained mass adoption in systems like the World Wide Web, but gives more control to the reader in determining what level of detail to read at.

It's 1968. We're unstuck in time. Douglas Engelbart gives the mother of all demos. Douglas Engelbart's lifelong mission is to raise the collective intelligence of humanity. I struggled to lose a few kilos. Doug's lifting all of us up.

Terry Pratchett said this about J.R.R.Tolkien:

Most modern fantasy just rearranges the furniture in Tolkien's attic.

Similarly, most modern computing just rearranges the furniture in Douglas Engelbart's attic. As Ted Nelson says here

He [Douglas Engelbart] invented word processing, outline processing, computer graphics, hypertext, the mouse... and all of this was part of his singular dream of 'How do we make people more powerful'

It's 1951, we're unstuck in time.

Doug's techniques amount to what he calls Intelligence Augmentation. In the way that a hammer extends and augment the leverage and power of the human arm, our tools should extend and augment the intelligence of our minds.

The mouse and hypermedia are here to stay, but many ideas from Engelbart remain "unrealised" today.

Have you noticed the problem with the mouse is that you have to keep switching between mouse and keyboard? So much so that some people avoid using a mouse altogether and just get really good at using keyboard shortcuts and other wizardy.

Doug was aware of this problem and invented the "Keyset" - a "chord keyboard" you would operate with just one hand. The mouse in one hand, the keyset in the other:

keyset_th.png

It has just five keys, but combinations of keys (like chords on a piano) would produce different letters. Read more about it, including Doug's teaching method.

Subclassing text

I love this quote about the invention of the Browser:

I just had to add hypertext, (by subclassing the Text object).
TimBL

www_original.gif

...from Tim Berners-Lee's "Vague but exciting" Information Management: A Proposal -- see it html-ized here... Information Management: A Proposal

  • Principle of least privilege

WikiWikiWeb

Ward Cunningham and others were discovering patterns everywhere they looked in programming. They couldn't record them quickly enough, so Ward made the Wiki Wiki: from an hawaiian word for Quick. It was a minimal addition to plain text that created new links to new pages any time the author joinedWordsTogether.

There's magic in Ward's innovation. Two or more words, if brought into contact with each other, would emit a burst of energy: a new concept would be formed and the power of their union would tear a wormhole through space, leading to a new page.

The other great innovation was that he let everyone edit. No permission model at all. You can read, you can edit. It was easy for other people to see what had been changed and to revert any vandalism. It's the "forgiveness over permission" model, espoused by Grace Hopper.

People poured many many words into that Wiki Wiki. It was in the era when the internet truly was "words plus enthusiasm"

Some of my favorite pages in ward's wiki:

The best way to get the right answer on the Internet is not to ask a question, it's to post the wrong answer.—Cunningham's Law (Ward Cunningham)

"The Electronic Labyrinth"

One of the inspirations for Wiki Wiki was HyperCard: a pre-WWW technology that let you build a personal information system in a dynamic and programmable way. There was considerable HyperCard Mania!. It was a time when the Citizen Programmer seemed to be the way computers were headed.

Other personal information systems also had innovative ideas and passionate fanbases.

Personal wikis such as the amazing Tiddly Wiki are great to explore and use. (I'm interested in TiddlyWiki in the Sky for Dropbox

It's not a long journey from there to note taking systems such as:

There are many great note taking systems throughout history, such as Cornell, shorthand, concept mapping, SQ3R and sketch notes.

When studying physics in highschool, and particularly when studying engineering, we were encourage to keep a Scientific Journal or Scientist's Notebook.

Here's a typical page from my journal in those days:

davinci_notebook_th.jpg

No wait, that was one of Leonardo Da Vinci's notebooks.

Some amazing scientist's notebook systems have emerged lately, particularly

Tropes

In architecture and programming we talk of "patterns" and the wiki was invented to captured their myriad forms. A different but very similar concept from the creative arts is the idea of "Tropes" and in particular the "TV Tropes" website.

Patterns and tropes are synonyms.

The big list of rpg plots is also the kind of problem wikis were made to solve, as is The Top 100 Things I'd Do If I Ever Became An Evil Overlord -- though wiki's are great for lists, they tend more toward sprawling networks of information.

Addressing

Addressing and identity are a crucial part of hyperlinks and versatility

if everything is addressable you need a kind of scheme or protocol for identifying things.

in Hyperscope, every element is automatically numbered. Easier than asking the author to name each thing.

Screencast of Douglas Engelbart's HyperScope Project from Brad Neuberg.

With markdown libraries they can automatically name every heading for you. Very helpful and takes the onus off the author to decide which parts of a document can be linked to.

a reference system with addresses can either return a single thing or a list of things. For example, a primary key only returns one item - or in CSS, a '#ID' selector should only return one element (but this is an unenforced constraint) but other ways of selecting can return many homogenous things, e.g. select * from person where managerid = 1, or many heterogeneous things - $(".item") - elements returned can be of many different types.

predicates that are applied to sets to filter them.

Ted Nelson, Xanadu project

Dan Bricklin and Bob Frankston invented the spreadsheet. A mind-blowing invention.

  • IDE

  • Locations.

    • Descartes staring at flies on the. Ceiling
      • Cartesian coordinates
    • Latitude longitude
    • Reverse geo coding
  • Addresses

  • Dewey decimal

  • Classification

  • Collation of alphabets

  • Pointers - pointers to pointers

  • Identity

    • Primary key

    • And foreign key

    • Resource identifier

    • And selectors

    • Jquery

    • Coda - return loop and again

    • Bookmarks

    • Referential frame theory

    • It's how neurons work

    • Words and word formation

    • Jquery addressing

    • URLs and on page identifiers

    • Letraset

    • Muldis D - the third manifesto, wikipedia: The Third Manifesto

    • Set mathematics

    • Russell's paradox

    • Godel incompleteness

    • Squarified Tree Maps

  • Codea.

  • Calca

  • Sql alternatives

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/SQL#Alternatives

  • LaTex

  • Literate programming

  • Literate Haskell

  • Jupyter notebooks

  • Syntax highlighting

  • Debugging

  • Step into

  • Step over

  • Breakpoint

  • ObservableHQ

  • Transclusions

  • "Mashups"

    • Yahoo Pipes
    • PopFly
    • IFTTT
    • Zapier

Lion kimbro how to create a map of every thought you’ve ever thunked.

Tiddlywiki

Processing

Ajax, perhaps the earliest surviving tragedy of Sophocles, presents the downfall and disgrace of a great hero whose suicide leads to his rehabilitation.
—A.F. Garvie in Sophocles: Ajax

Seymour Papert Logo minstorms

Alan Kay DynaBook

Ivan Sutherland SketchPad

Hypercard

References